In the heart of heighington and open to all

You are certain of a warm welcome at St Michael’s. Come

along to one of our services and worship God in a friendly and

inviting atmosphere. We have both Church of England and

Methodist members. The parish also has a second small

church, St Andrew’s, at Bolam. We are proud of our strong links

with Heighington CE Primary School.

If you come to a service at 9.30am on a Sunday or at 10am on a Thursday, please join us for tea or coffee and biscuits afterwards, with a pleasant chat, and also purchase items from the Traidcraft stall or bookshelf.
The recently refurbished church tower was originally a watch-tower and signal station but now provides a reference point, representing peace of a different sort. People have worshipped here for centuries St Michael’s has stood since Norman times and today Christians are working out what it means to be followers of Jesus Christ in our own times too. Our church is the centre of the village, and as a congregation we seek to be identified with the community of which we are a part.
The recently refurbished church tower was originally a watch- tower and signal station but now provides a reference point, representing peace of a different sort. People have worshipped here for centuries St Michael’s has stood since Norman times and today Christians are working out what it means to be followers of Jesus Christ in our own times too. Our church is the centre of the village, and as a congregation we seek to be identified with the community of which we are a part.
Interested in joining the Friends of St Michael’s, Heighington? – Contact Revd Lissa Scott for details
St Michael’s  Church, Heighington
A warm welcome to everyone
Thought for the month – Easter – by Rev. Lissa Scott
 
.
.
Some live services re-start on April 2nd
Like most of you, I expect, I am fed up of talking about Covid. There seems to be nothing else to talk about it’s even overtaken the weather as the staple topic of conversation and there’s very little else on the news. So in this letter, I’m going to try not to even mention it again. After all, we have something far more important to think about this month which is Easter. I know how much it means to many of you to see those first snowdrops, to see the bright colours of crocuses and daffodils all those signs of new life. They brighten our spirits and lift our hearts. Hearing the birds sing in the trees and seeing new lambs in the field fills us with hope and joy. How much more then should the good news of Easter affect us that promise that the power of life is stronger than the power of death, and will always triumph!
Of course, one thing that we learn from the events of Holy Week, is that the path to Resurrection leads through Crucifixion. Jesus had to die to bring us that promise of new life, and many of the good things in this life are won through hardship and struggle. But we are called to believe in the power of life and love to be a Resurrection people, filled with hope, and trusting in the power of God to continually bring forth new and eternal life. However, it’s easier for us to be hopeful than for many in this world. We live in a beautiful place, surrounded by lush trees and green grass, where we see new life and growth around us constantly. We live in a country where there is clean water, free medical care, and for most of us warm homes and enough to eat. We may have just endured a year of a kind we have never known before, but we have every reason to be optimistic that things are improving and a brighter future lies before us. And these things certainly make it easier to believe in a God who loves us. So spare a thought for those elsewhere in our world who have been suffering for far longer than a year through famine, drought, warfare, sickness and for whom there seems no prospect of things improving. If we are really an Easter people, who believe in the power of Resurrection, then we should be filled with the desire to help those going through times of Crucifixion. I hope that the events of this year will open our eyes to what many endure their whole lives, and motivate us to do more to help. That way, something good will have come out of what we have been through this year. (Yes, I know that although I haven’t used the dreaded word, I have reverted to the same topic!) And, after all, that is what Resurrection is all about bringing healing and hope out of times of crucifixion and suffering, and showing that love will always triumph.
St Michael’s  Church, Heighington

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A WARM WELCOME TO ALL
Interested in joining the Friends of St Michael’s, Heighington? – Contact Revd Lissa Scott for details
St Michael’s  Church, Heighington
 
.
.
Like most of you, I expect, I am fed up of talking about Covid. There seems to be nothing else to talk about it’s even overtaken the weather as the staple topic of conversation and there’s very little else on the news. So in this letter, I’m going to try not to even mention it again. After all, we have something far more important to think about this month which is Easter. I know how much it means to many of you to see those first snowdrops, to see the bright colours of crocuses and daffodils all those signs of new life. They brighten our spirits and lift our hearts. Hearing the birds sing in the trees and seeing new lambs in the field fills us with hope and joy. How much more then should the good news of Easter affect us that promise that the power of life is stronger than the power of death, and will always triumph!
Of course, one thing that we learn from the events of Holy Week, is that the path to Resurrection leads through Crucifixion. Jesus had to die to bring us that promise of new life, and many of the good things in this life are won through hardship and struggle. But we are called to believe in the power of life and love to be a Resurrection people, filled with hope, and trusting in the power of God to continually bring forth new and eternal life. However, it’s easier for us to be hopeful than for many in this world. We live in a beautiful place, surrounded by lush trees and green grass, where we see new life and growth around us constantly. We live in a country where there is clean water, free medical care, and for most of us warm homes and enough to eat. We may have just endured a year of a kind we have never known before, but we have every reason to be optimistic that things are improving and a brighter future lies before us. And these things certainly make it easier to believe in a God who loves us. So spare a thought for those elsewhere in our world who have been suffering for far longer than a year through famine, drought, warfare, sickness and for whom there seems no prospect of things improving. If we are really an Easter people, who believe in the power of Resurrection, then we should be filled with the desire to help those going through times of Crucifixion. I hope that the events of this year will open our eyes to what many endure their whole lives, and motivate us to do more to help. That way, something good will have come out of what we have been through this year. (Yes, I know that although I haven’t used the dreaded word, I have reverted to the same topic!) And, after all, that is what Resurrection is all about bringing healing and hope out of times of crucifixion and suffering, and showing that love will always triumph.
Some live services re-start on April 2nd
Interested in joining the Friends of St Michael’s, Heighington? – Contact Revd Lissa Scott for details
St Michael’s  Church, Heighington
A warm welcome to everyone
Thought for the month – Easter – by Rev. Lissa Scott
 
.
.
Like most of you, I expect, I am fed up of talking about Covid. There seems to be nothing else to talk about it’s even overtaken the weather as the staple topic of conversation and there’s very little else on the news. So in this letter, I’m going to try not to even mention it again. After all, we have something far more important to think about this month which is Easter. I know how much it means to many of you to see those first snowdrops, to see the bright colours of crocuses and daffodils all those signs of new life. They brighten our spirits and lift our hearts. Hearing the birds sing in the trees and seeing new lambs in the field fills us with hope and joy. How much more then should the good news of Easter affect us that promise that the power of life is stronger than the power of death, and will always triumph!
Of course, one thing that we learn from the events of Holy Week, is that the path to Resurrection leads through Crucifixion. Jesus had to die to bring us that promise of new life, and many of the good things in this life are won through hardship and struggle. But we are called to believe in the power of life and love to be a Resurrection people, filled with hope, and trusting in the power of God to continually bring forth new and eternal life. However, it’s easier for us to be hopeful than for many in this world. We live in a beautiful place, surrounded by lush trees and green grass, where we see new life and growth around us constantly. We live in a country where there is clean water, free medical care, and for most of us warm homes and enough to eat. We may have just endured a year of a kind we have never known before, but we have every reason to be optimistic that things are improving and a brighter future lies before us. And these things certainly make it easier to believe in a God who loves us. So spare a thought for those elsewhere in our world who have been suffering for far longer than a year through famine, drought, warfare, sickness and for whom there seems no prospect of things improving. If we are really an Easter people, who believe in the power of Resurrection, then we should be filled with the desire to help those going through times of Crucifixion. I hope that the events of this year will open our eyes to what many endure their whole lives, and motivate us to do more to help. That way, something good will have come out of what we have been through this year. (Yes, I know that although I haven’t used the dreaded word, I have reverted to the same topic!) And, after all, that is what Resurrection is all about bringing healing and hope out of times of crucifixion and suffering, and showing that love will always triumph.
Some live services re-start on April 2nd
Interested in joining the Friends of St Michael’s, Heighington? – Contact Revd Lissa Scott for details
St Michael’s  Church, Heighington
A warm welcome to everyone
Thought for the month – Easter – by Rev. Lissa Scott
.
.
Like most of you, I expect, I am fed up of talking about Covid. There seems to be nothing else to talk about it’s even overtaken the weather as the staple topic of conversation and there’s very little else on the news. So in this letter, I’m going to try not to even mention it again. After all, we have something far more important to think about this month which is Easter. I know how much it means to many of you to see those first snowdrops, to see the bright colours of crocuses and daffodils all those signs of new life. They brighten our spirits and lift our hearts. Hearing the birds sing in the trees and seeing new lambs in the field fills us with hope and joy. How much more then should the good news of Easter affect us that promise that the power of life is stronger than the power of death, and will always triumph!
Of course, one thing that we learn from the events of Holy Week, is that the path to Resurrection leads through Crucifixion. Jesus had to die to bring us that promise of new life, and many of the good things in this life are won through hardship and struggle. But we are called to believe in the power of life and love to be a Resurrection people, filled with hope, and trusting in the power of God to continually bring forth new and eternal life. However, it’s easier for us to be hopeful than for many in this world. We live in a beautiful place, surrounded by lush trees and green grass, where we see new life and growth around us constantly. We live in a country where there is clean water, free medical care, and for most of us warm homes and enough to eat. We may have just endured a year of a kind we have never known before, but we have every reason to be optimistic that things are improving and a brighter future lies before us. And these things certainly make it easier to believe in a God who loves us. So spare a thought for those elsewhere in our world who have been suffering for far longer than a year through famine, drought, warfare, sickness and for whom there seems no prospect of things improving. If we are really an Easter people, who believe in the power of Resurrection, then we should be filled with the desire to help those going through times of Crucifixion. I hope that the events of this year will open our eyes to what many endure their whole lives, and motivate us to do more to help. That way, something good will have come out of what we have been through this year. (Yes, I know that although I haven’t used the dreaded word, I have reverted to the same topic!) And, after all, that is what Resurrection is all about bringing healing and hope out of times of crucifixion and suffering, and showing that love will always triumph.
Some live services re-start on April 2nd
Interested in joining the Friends of St Michael’s, Heighington? – Contact Revd Lissa Scott for details
St Michael’s  Church, Heighington
A warm welcome to everyone
Thought for the month – Easter – by Rev. Lissa Scott
 
.
.
All live services cancelled from January 4th. See ‘Fridays’ on the Events page
Like most of you, I expect, I am fed up of talking about Covid. There seems to be nothing else to talk about it’s even overtaken the weather as the staple topic of conversation and there’s very little else on the news. So in this letter, I’m going to try not to even mention it again. After all, we have something far more important to think about this month which is Easter. I know how much it means to many of you to see those first snowdrops, to see the bright colours of crocuses and daffodils all those signs of new life. They brighten our spirits and lift our hearts. Hearing the birds sing in the trees and seeing new lambs in the field fills us with hope and joy. How much more then should the good news of Easter affect us that promise that the power of life is stronger than the power of death, and will always triumph!
Of course, one thing that we learn from the events of Holy Week, is that the path to Resurrection leads through Crucifixion. Jesus had to die to bring us that promise of new life, and many of the good things in this life are won through hardship and struggle. But we are called to believe in the power of life and love to be a Resurrection people, filled with hope, and trusting in the power of God to continually bring forth new and eternal life. However, it’s easier for us to be hopeful than for many in this world. We live in a beautiful place, surrounded by lush trees and green grass, where we see new life and growth around us constantly. We live in a country where there is clean water, free medical care, and for most of us warm homes and enough to eat. We may have just endured a year of a kind we have never known before, but we have every reason to be optimistic that things are improving and a brighter future lies before us. And these things certainly make it easier to believe in a God who loves us. So spare a thought for those elsewhere in our world who have been suffering for far longer than a year through famine, drought, warfare, sickness and for whom there seems no prospect of things improving. If we are really an Easter people, who believe in the power of Resurrection, then we should be filled with the desire to help those going through times of Crucifixion. I hope that the events of this year will open our eyes to what many endure their whole lives, and motivate us to do more to help. That way, something good will have come out of what we have been through this year. (Yes, I know that although I haven’t used the dreaded word, I have reverted to the same topic!) And, after all, that is what Resurrection is all about bringing healing and hope out of times of crucifixion and suffering, and showing that love will always triumph.
Some live services re-start on April 2nd
Interested in joining the Friends of St Michael’s, Heighington? – Contact Revd Lissa Scott for details
St Michael’s  Church, Heighington
A warm welcome to everyone
Thought for the month – Easter – by Rev. Lissa Scott
 
.
.
Like most of you, I expect, I am fed up of talking about Covid. There seems to be nothing else to talk about it’s even overtaken the weather as the staple topic of conversation and there’s very little else on the news. So in this letter, I’m going to try not to even mention it again. After all, we have something far more important to think about this month which is Easter. I know how much it means to many of you to see those first snowdrops, to see the bright colours of crocuses and daffodils all those signs of new life. They brighten our spirits and lift our hearts. Hearing the birds sing in the trees and seeing new lambs in the field fills us with hope and joy. How much more then should the good news of Easter affect us that promise that the power of life is stronger than the power of death, and will always triumph!
Of course, one thing that we learn from the events of Holy Week, is that the path to Resurrection leads through Crucifixion. Jesus had to die to bring us that promise of new life, and many of the good things in this life are won through hardship and struggle. But we are called to believe in the power of life and love to be a Resurrection people, filled with hope, and trusting in the power of God to continually bring forth new and eternal life. However, it’s easier for us to be hopeful than for many in this world. We live in a beautiful place, surrounded by lush trees and green grass, where we see new life and growth around us constantly. We live in a country where there is clean water, free medical care, and for most of us warm homes and enough to eat. We may have just endured a year of a kind we have never known before, but we have every reason to be optimistic that things are improving and a brighter future lies before us. And these things certainly make it easier to believe in a God who loves us. So spare a thought for those elsewhere in our world who have been suffering for far longer than a year through famine, drought, warfare, sickness and for whom there seems no prospect of things improving. If we are really an Easter people, who believe in the power of Resurrection, then we should be filled with the desire to help those going through times of Crucifixion. I hope that the events of this year will open our eyes to what many endure their whole lives, and motivate us to do more to help. That way, something good will have come out of what we have been through this year. (Yes, I know that although I haven’t used the dreaded word, I have reverted to the same topic!) And, after all, that is what Resurrection is all about bringing healing and hope out of times of crucifixion and suffering, and showing that love will always triumph.
Some live services re-start on April 2nd